4 Tactics to Improve the Way Students Accept a Job Offer – Blog Job Hunting Career Management Solutions


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When the graduation is just around the corner, everyone wants to get a job offer as soon as possible. It is a huge weight off their shoulders for students to know that they have a job and a source of income that can be trusted right after college.

But maybe they’re thinking all this is wrong. According to a Study Recently with the participation of the National Bureau of Economic Research, about 52% of men and 60% of women get a job before graduating from college. And those who do earn less money in the first year of work compared to their longer-awaited colleagues.

As a career counselor, it is your responsibility to support next year’s graduates in entering the work circle. But, according to the data, this may warn them against taking advantage of the first opportunity that has come their way.

To protect the salary they deserve, teach your students to do the following before they enthusiastically accept a job offer:

Know their value

Although people of all genders doubt their abilities from time to time, the above study suggests that young women are particularly vulnerable to work when they deserve better. This behavior appears in the study time and time again.

A 2021 Survey Fishbowl demonstrates that gender pay gaps are not just caused by discriminatory systems. 36.2% of nearly 17,000 professionals said “epidemic-related changes” prevented them from requesting a raise. Of those surveyed, only 31.8% were men, while 42.4% were women.

So when young women are unable to seek pay raises or negotiate higher wages, they lose opportunities for better pay and career development. Your actions now can help inspire students to go after what they deserve.

  • Once a student knows which industry he wants to enter, show him the average earnings at the entry level. Next, we discussed what reasonable expectations given their experience and skill set.
  • Remind students that relevant experience is not everything. Demonstrated that their soft skills or even their experience in the plague would emphasize that they were an ideal worker.
  • Lead the students in the process of preparing a five-year plan. How long do they have to wait before they ask for a raise? For promotion? At what stage should they continue in a new job?

Highlight what they are looking for

Another issue is when job seekers are unsure what qualities they want in an ideal employer. If they have no expectations or priorities, they can get a job offer for no other reason than the fact that it is a full-time job.

For the upcoming school year, he planned to host events that will get students engaged in the elements of job satisfaction. Explain that certain environments, such as those with a verbally abusive boss, are harmful to everyone. But many, like those who offer flexible working hours, can be positive or negative depending on personal preferences.

Trial and error is one method for someone to learn which cultures and leadership styles of society work best. But examining preferences before starting a job search saves time and stress.

If you have not already done so, you should also introduce resources that help students learn what income they need to fit into a postgraduate budget. Through them, students will be willing to provide employers with the minimum annual salary they will consider.

Say no to unpleasant situations

There is a critical lesson to be learned from a fairy tale about a frog and a pot of boiling water. The premise is that if a frog suddenly finds itself in boiling water, it will jump out. But if the water at room temperature and the heat gradually increases, the frog will boil alive.

All this to say, there are certain situations that you want your job seekers to jump out of right away. It is easy to negotiate. So what if the water warms up? It could be a lot worse! But this job-seeking mentality will only lead to an unhealthy job situation.

This is not enough to help students identify evidence of toxicity in job postings and interviews. This lesson is critical, but it is not effective if students are willing to follow it. They must understand that it will most likely harm their mental health if they are offered a job with even light red flags.

The best way to teach is by using examples as close to the real world as you can. For example, open worksheets with three worksheets on them so that students can practice identifying relevant details. You can also create a fake interview script or conduct fake interviews for the same purpose. Then, after they have chosen the positive and negative traits, ask them to decide if the work is still worth continuing.

Here is what job seekers should expect from healthy work teams remotely.

Wait for the right opportunity

Job seekers who are determined to persevere in the job of their dreams are likely to be disappointed. At the entry level, there will usually be some aspect of the job that reduces job satisfaction. But that does not mean job seekers should settle down. As we have said, some jobs are simply not suitable or not a healthy choice.

In this year’s senior leaflets, include questions they need to ask themselves to decide if this is the right time to get a job offer.

Some of these questions may include:

  • Will the salary and benefits cover my needs?
  • Does the compensation they offer make sense to my experience and skill level?
  • Is there evidence of company culture, and does it appeal to me?
  • Does the employer’s atmosphere deter for any reason?
  • Do I feel respected by the representatives of this company?

You can not shy away from talking about student loan debt. Here’s how to make them effective!


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