Teaching College Students about the Internship Resume – Blog Job Hunting Career Management Solutions


0 Flares



Twitter


0








Facebook


0








LinkedIn


0








Google+


0






0 Flares


×

When students come to the center of their careers and ask for help with a resume to specialize in, you know you are doing something right. Your reach should extend beyond identifying the right professional or starting the job search process. All the steps in between, including a great internship landing, are supposed to take up a sizable portion of your steering wheel as well.

Walking students through the small details of internship applications can feel like preparing for a job with a few training wheels. And you should take the opportunity to draw these parallels. If your guidance is helpful now, the student can apply what they have learned for future job search. They are also more likely to return to the center and recommend it to friends!

But keep in mind that an internship resume does serve a different purpose and audience than a full-time one.

These are the features that your student team must understand and what you can do to provide this information:

Getting an internship is high risk. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) is conducting research for an annual work forecast. With her Findings 2020, NACE reported that internship experience can play a significant role in determining who will get the job. Between two equal candidates, the position will be offered to those who have completed an internship in an organization or industry. So you must make sure the resume is top notch.

Work experience, skills and education

These sections will look quite similar in the resume of the internship and the resume of the job. Be sure to mention that the strategies you offer to make the skills pop up and fascinating work experience details can apply to the resume they will be working on in the future.

Depending on the level of comfort of the student with a resume, teach them how to fit into a specific role. If they have never seen a resume before, this information may be too crucial to process. But the more intermediate or advanced levels will benefit a lot from going over with you the priorities of the internship and reflecting them on paper.

Relevant courses

If the student you are working with does not have a part-time job or babysitter appearances, encourage him or her to replace the work experience section with relevant study jobs. They can discuss what they did in the course, what they learned, group projects they led, and so on. But be sure to note that coursework should not be the focus of a resume after the internship.

Of course, a year or two after college, there can still be some course information. However, the responsibilities and achievements in the internship they land on should take the spotlight.

Academic achievements

Academic accomplishments are impressive, but grabbing a spot with three awards from last year in high school two years ago is not worth it.

The recent achievements of a college student should be from the college. Students should limit the passage to the name and year of the award and perhaps a brief explanation of what it represents if it is not self-evident. Additional details are not required and if information is limited – do not include this section.

Evidence of leadership

No matter if an employer is looking for interns or full-time employees, they give priority to candidates with leadership skills at the moment. According to 2021 Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends, 60% of managers say leadership qualities are essential at all levels to prepare for an unknown future.

Therefore, dig into the student’s history to identify moments of involvement on campus, part-time, or while volunteering, where they demonstrate these leadership qualities.

Recommended reading: Encourage students to start professional development sooner rather than later.

References

Similar to applying for a job, there is no reason for a student to include references in the resume of the internship unless the company has specifically requested it.

Make sure students have a ready list of professional referrals however. Club or academic advisors, professors, coaches and volunteer coordinators are excellent options as a reference for internships. Friends from school do not.

You can always post that career counselors are happy to help with internship requests, but that will only come so far. Not everyone is excited about signing up for a one-on-one training because of the time it takes from their day and the courage it takes to ask for help.

Here are some more ideas to start your brainstorm:

Classroom workshop

Coordination with professors to run a classroom workshop. This is the best guarantee to reach most students. In addition, the workshop can help those who have not planned to visit the Career Center to start relying on your expertise. Seminars in the first year, excellence classes or elective courses in life skills like personal finance are best suited for these workshops.

Newsletter

Newsletters are great because you can include more detailed information in one place. Instead of reviewing the surface level of just one subject to provide the lowest skill level, you can dive in depth with monthly payments of the series.

With leaflets, however, you are fighting against the attention span. Students receive a lot of emails, and you need your message to show up to get their attention and convey the information. If you have time, include an infographic, recent research, or embed a YouTube video.

sheet

Open a worksheet with a summary of a resume to specialize in, a true or false section and a resume completion template.

You have a resource that can be easily captured and transferred when you do not have time to dive into it. And the inclusion of those interactive elements increases the likelihood that students will look at it and retain the information.

Put the PDF on your site. Include it in emails. Release copies with professors to share in class! If you are able to be particularly generous, offer a reward to students who will bring a full worksheet to the center.


To connect with students even more, use these methods too!


0 Flares



Twitter


0








Facebook


0








LinkedIn


0








Google+


0






0 Flares


×

Source

Similar Articles

Comments

Most Popular